Christian Articles to Encourage and Edify

Donna Watkins photoArchived from the free email list, A Healing Moment.

Visit Donna at her website: The Nature In Us.

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Copyright Information: Permission is granted for use of articles written by Donna L. Watkins if credit includes the author's name and an active link to this website.


"A wounded spirit who can bear?" (Proverbs 18:14)

Earth has no sorrow that heaven cannot heal.
-- from the hymn "Come Ye Disconsolate"

REJECTION

This article is from a six-part series that ran in our free online publication, A Healing Moment. You might want to begin with the first part of the series.

REJECTION: A Path to Death

Rejection begins an insidious process that leads to two different lines of reaction. Neither of these is an absolute law, according to Derek Prince, but he has seen these situations occur consistently, with people he's counseled with, to indicate a definite pattern. We'll explore one of these lines in this issue and the other in the next issue.

On the first line, after rejection is loneliness. This begins a downfall that causes people to make bad choices and to isolate themselves even further from people and society. There are lonely people all around us, even on a Sunday morning in church.

Rejection isolates. People will find ways to avoid people, fearing they will be rejected again, and this doesn't have to be a conscious choice. All of us know reclusive type people. Most would tell you that they just don't need people, or don't feel comfortable around people. When asked why some can tell you a story of rejection, but most will not even know how they got that way.

Loneliness leads to misery. We all know miserable people. Some of them seem to have dedicated their lives to trying to make others realize how miserable life really is. Have you ever been around somebody who only has negative things to say? Only mentions the bad news, never the good.

This leads to self-pity, always feeling sorry for oneself: "Nobody understands me! Why did God make me like this? I must be an awful person because nobody wants to be around me."

Self-pity leads to depression. Moods of gloominess that settle down all over you. Everything feels dark and heavy. This leads to despair, feeling like you're helpless, and that leads to hopelessness: "I may as well give up! Nothing is going to work."

Hopelessness leads to death or suicide. Our heart can get so heavy that we literally bring on death. You may have seen this when a spouse dies after 50 years of marriage. The one remaining has no idea what life is all about without the other and they pass on shortly after.

Suicide is more radical. It comes with statements like: "I might as well end it all! What's the use of living? There's nothing to live for."

As you can see, rejection can literally take away your life if you don't deal with it. It may be a seemingly slow process, but you can't allow it to progress and take the life you were given to glorify God. It's time to deal with rejection and get it out of your life! Derek Prince's book, mentioned below, can help you do that.

Maybe you see these patterns in your children. While you have them at home, deal with this. Help them to see life differently. Help them to get rejection out of their lives.

We'll explore the other path that rejection can lead to in the next issue.

References:
1. "Rejection to Acceptance" an article published in the September 1977 edition of "New Wine, The International Magazine Dedicated to Christian Growth." Derek's book, "God's Remedy for Rejection" can be purchased at Barnes and Noble.

2. " A More Excellent Way" by Henry Wright. More information on this book can be found on our website because this book has changed my life tremendously:

Christian Articles to Encourage and Edify

Donna Watkins photoArchived from the free email list, A Healing Moment.

Visit Donna at her website: The Nature In Us.

Please shop with us for your natural health supplements.

Copyright Information: Permission is granted for use of articles written by Donna L. Watkins if credit includes the author's name and an active link to this website.